[{"id":1,"question":"What is the Chicago Prize?","answer":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\n

The Chicago Prize is offered by the Pritzker Traubert Foundation. The Pritzker Traubert Foundation invests in people and programs that enrich the lives of Chicagoans and works to close the city’s economic opportunity gap. 

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This competition invites proposals for collaborative, community-driven initiatives focused on using neighborhood revitalization to increase economic success for residents on Chicago’s South and/or West Side. The Foundation will award $100,000 to up to four (4) Finalists, one of which will receive a $10 million grant to implement their initiative over five years.

\n\n\t\n","imageUrl":""},{"id":2,"question":"Why is Pritzker Traubert Foundation using a competition?","answer":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

We want to ensure a process that is fair, open, and transparent, and one which encourages partnerships and highlights community-led initiatives underway around the city. The Chicago Prize concept was developed under the advice and guidance of countless partners and citywide leaders. The Pritzker Traubert Foundation is especially grateful for the contributions of MacArthur Foundation, Lever for Change, Urban Institute, Lloyd Consulting Inc., Rudd Resources, and BCG's Center for Illinois' Future, among many others. 

\n\n\t\n","imageUrl":""},{"id":3,"question":"Why focus on physical asset development?","answer":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

The South and West sides of Chicago have been marked by decades of disinvestment and inequitable development due to structural barriers and racism, leading to a perception of the communities that is, too often, deficit-based. We believe that there are residents, organizers, community leaders and others in these communities whose ideas and solutions, when intentionally joined with the redevelopment of physical assets, might be catalytic for the people and businesses there.

\n\n\t\n","imageUrl":""},{"id":4,"question":"What are different types of place-based, neighborhood revitalization initiatives?","answer":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

Many communities use the redevelopment of physical assets to catalyze neighborhood revitalization. Some of these efforts focus on individual projects, while others include multiple sites and locations within or across targeted neighborhoods. Common examples include urban greening, housing, and adaptive reuse. Urban greening strategies can transform vacant lots or underused assets into parks, trails, community gardens, green infrastructure, and other community recreation amenities. Government often partners with nonprofit and private developers to coordinate the acquisition, renovation and/or construction of new affordable housing that offers residents quality places to live and often access to assets like healthy recreation, retail, or live-work opportunities. Another common strategy is to restore and reuse civic (e.g., libraries, neighborhood schools, and community recreation centers) and commercial assets (e.g. retail strips, mixed use buildings) to meet evolving needs of residents and create a strategic foundation for community change. These and other place-based initiatives often involve important services, such as job training, small business development, and health and education programs, that help leverage the benefits of the physical revitalization and activate the spaces. For more details, consult the Urban Institute’s framing paper, “Catalyzing Neighborhood Revitalization by Strengthening Civic Infrastructure—Principles for Place-Based Initiatives.”

\n\n\t\n","imageUrl":""},{"id":5,"question":"Is this competition open only to invited organizations or can any entity apply?","answer":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\n

Any US-based, 501(c)3 nonprofit organization may register and apply as lead organization for the Chicago Prize. Please complete the Assessment Tool to confirm that you are a strong fit for the Chicago Prize and that you meet our
Core Principles.

\n\n\t\n","imageUrl":""},{"id":6,"question":"Who should be on my team? How do we apply together?","answer":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

Successful teams will assemble the expertise needed to make their project a success. While teams will vary by initiative and community, collaborations should be able to demonstrate:

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Teams may include experts and partners based outside Chicago. Proposed initiatives must take place in, and benefit residents from, Chicago’s South and/or West Side to remain eligible.

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As you form your collaboration, teams should identify a lead organization, ideally the community-based nonprofit or intermediary, which will register to create an account for that team, and subsequently submit the application. All members of a team are encouraged to review the application and its goals and requirements. Lead organizations are welcome to partner with for-profit companies, foundations, schools, colleges and universities, government agencies, and other entities to implement the initiative. Refer to the Rules for a complete set of eligibility requirements. If you have further questions on eligibility, please contact us.

\n\n\t\n","imageUrl":"img/faq-demo-image.png"},{"id":7,"question":"What types of initiatives are you looking for?","answer":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\n

The Chicago Prize seeks applications from community-led partnerships that both meet our Core Principles and affirmatively answer most of the questions in our Assessment Tool. We are interested in investment-ready projects that can leverage additional capital (especially Opportunity Zones) to make a positive impact on the community and increase the efforts underway and ensure success.

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The proposal should focus on physical revitalization or developments that create positive momentum, strengthen local networks of people and organizations, and lead to economic and social benefits for the low-income residents of that community. Partnerships should develop or revitalize physical assets within the proposed geographic footprint, such as land and/or buildings, in ways that will build and strengthen civic infrastructure. The Chicago Prize is especially interested in initiatives that pilot new solutions to overcome longstanding challenges in community revitalization.

\n\n\t\n","imageUrl":""},{"id":8,"question":"How do I apply?","answer":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

You must first assess your fit for the Chicago Prize and then register no later than Tuesday, July 16, 2019 at 5:00 PM Central. Registration is a simple two-step process. First, create a username and password and provide an email address, then check your inbox for confirmation that your account has been established. Next, complete the online registration form. Once registered, submit your application no later than Tuesday, August 13, 2019 at 5:00 PM Central Prior to submitting your online application, please reconfirm the information on your registration form is correct by going to Profile (top left of Dashboard) then Edit Registration Form.

\n\n\n\n\t\n","imageUrl":""},{"id":9,"question":"How should Chicago Prize funding be used?","answer":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

The $100,000 grant awarded to up to four Finalists will be used to refine the initial proposals, develop additional plans for implementation and evaluation, and further prepare to compete for a single $10 million award, under a grant agreement that will be signed with the Foundation. The grant agreement will outline the additional information that will be required to compete. 

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The recipient of the $10 million must use Chicago Prize grant funds primarily for capital costs as well as set aside at least $500,000 for ongoing performance measurement and impact evaluation. Some administration or programming/activation costs can be included if needed for impact. Because each project is different, there is no fixed threshold for what counts as using grant funds “primarily” for capital, however the Chicago Prize will give preference to initiatives that can use more of the grant dollars for capital than other uses. During the second phase of the competition, the four Finalists will work with a Foundation-identified third-party evaluator to create evaluation plans. Other in-kind technical assistance will also be offered.

\n\n\t\n","imageUrl":""},{"id":10,"question":"How will submissions be assessed?","answer":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

Each valid application will receive scores and comments from at least five (5) reviewers using four scoring criteria (all scores are normalized). Top-scoring submissions will be reviewed by the Pritzker Traubert Foundation to select up to four (4) Finalists based on considerations that may include, but are not limited to, rank order, organizational capacity, and submission feasibility. The Pritzker Traubert Foundation will determine the Finalists for Chicago Prize in consultation with expert reviewers and advisors. 

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Each Finalist will receive $100,000 each and advance to the second phase of the competition. The Pritzker Traubert Foundation will then select the recipient of the Chicago Prize based on consideration of the additional initiative detail provided and other work resulting from the planning grant. The Selection Committee will determine the Award Recipient using criteria that may include but are not limited to those used in the initial phase of assessment.

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Through this application process, up to four (4) Chicago Prize Finalists are eligible to receive $100,000 of planning funds under a grant agreement with the Pritzker Traubert Foundation. Under the grant agreement, the Finalists will be asked to further develop their action plan, to include detailed budgets (including pro-formas) with proposed timeline, evaluation plans, memoranda of understanding with each initiative partner, site/construction plans, community engagement plans (including displacement prevention strategy), a visual presentation, long-term sustainability strategy, and additional information as appropriate to each initiative. Some additional technical assistance will be offered in addition to grant funds to help Finalists develop the materials listed above. 

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This planning period culminates with a citywide event in Spring 2020 to celebrate the Finalists and provide Finalists with the opportunity to present their initiatives to an audience of stakeholders, community leaders, and other funders.

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The final Awardee will be required to sign a multi-year grant agreement to receive a $10 million grant with Pritzker Traubert Foundation. The agreement terms will be based on the project’s proposal. 

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Please see the application and rules for requirements.

\n\n\t\n","imageUrl":""},{"id":13,"question":"What is \"civic infrastructure\"?","answer":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

The Pritzker Traubert Foundation’s definition of civic infrastructure is based on research by the Aspen Institute that views civic infrastructure as the policies, programs, practices and processes that connect physical revitalization with a neighborhood’s people and intangible value – its customs, culture, networks and relationships. Considering the complexities that surround neighborhood revitalization, it becomes essential to engage all sectors and enlist all community voices as part of the  process of strengthening civic infrastructure. Learn more here.

\n\n\t\n","imageUrl":""},{"id":14,"question":" What are different types of place-based, neighborhood revitalization initiatives?","answer":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\t\t

Many communities use the redevelopment of physical assets to catalyze neighborhood revitalization. Some of these efforts focus on individual projects, while others include multiple sites and locations within or across targeted neighborhoods. Common examples include urban greening, housing, and adaptive reuse. Urban greening strategies can transform vacant lots or underused assets into parks, trails, community gardens, green infrastructure, and other community recreation amenities.

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Government often partners with nonprofit and private developers to coordinate the acquisition, renovation and/or construction of new affordable housing that offers residents quality places to live and often access to assets like healthy recreation, retail, or live-work opportunities. Another common strategy is to restore and reuse civic (e.g., libraries, neighborhood schools, and community recreation centers) and commercial assets (e.g. retail strips, mixed use buildings) to meet evolving needs of residents and create a strategic foundation for community change. These and other place-based initiatives often involve important services, such as job training, small business development, and health and education programs, that help leverage the benefits of the physical revitalization and activate the spaces. 

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For more details, consult the Urban Institute’s framing paper, “Catalyzing Neighborhood Revitalization by Strengthening Civic Infrastructure—Principles for Place-Based Initiatives.

\n\t\n","imageUrl":""},{"id":14,"question":"How much time should my team plan to spend developing our application?","answer":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

Assembling a competitive application will require time and other resources from a lead organization and its team. Before your team applies, you are encouraged to complete the Assessment, a tool designed to ensure that you are ready to apply for the Chicago Prize. The Assessment should be completed before registering to apply, which means it must be done before the July 16, 2019 registration deadline.

\n\n\t\n","imageUrl":""},{"id":15,"question":"My organization just learned about this opportunity. Should we brainstorm ideas to develop our application? ","answer":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

The Chicago Prize seeks to invest in community-led initiatives that are to some degree investment-ready, having moved beyond initial visioning and planning. New ideas that have not already been embraced by the community may not give your team the time it needs to develop a competitive application. Take the Assessment to evaluate whether a new idea is ready for this process.

\n\n\t\n","imageUrl":""},{"id":16,"question":"What are important dates for the Chicago Prize?","answer":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\n

The deadline to complete the registration form is July 16, 2019 at 5:00 PM Central. The deadline for full applications is August 13, 2019 at 5:00 PM Central. We expect to announce Finalists for the award before the end of 2019, and the Chicago Prize’s Awardee will be announced in Spring 2020. Please view the full timeline and key dates here.

\n\n\t\n","imageUrl":""},{"id":17,"question":"Why $10 million?","answer":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

By funding one grant at $10 million, the Chicago Prize hopes to provide a significant amount of flexible funding for capital expenses that encourages other investment and provides lasting positive change to a geographic area.  Our goal is that providing a no-cost, flexible $10 million capital infusion will encourage funding from other sources, as well as creative collaborations that will amplify the impact of our investment.

\n\n\t\n","imageUrl":""},{"id":18,"question":"What is the period of performance for this grant?","answer":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

The period of performance is 10 years. The 10-year lifecycle provides more time for the recipient to implement its strategies, begin to see short- and middle-term outcomes, and stay with the effort long enough to demonstrate lasting impact. We expect that most of the Chicago Prize money will be spent in the first two to five years, since its purpose is providing additional capital to an initiative that is already underway, or one that could quickly pivot from planning to action. For that reason, applications should be shaped or connected by existing community plans and applicants should demonstrate readiness to implement.

\n\n\t\n","imageUrl":""},{"id":19,"question":"How big of a geography should my project target?","answer":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

The geographic footprint of the initiative will be defined by applicants. Applicants should include a rationale for the defined area and detail its history, challenges, current status, and promising opportunities. The defined area can range from single site to multiple development sites or locations across several neighborhoods. Depending on the defined area, proposed impacts will be specified by the applicant and may vary by size, project requirements, stage of investments, and other factors. Initiatives should prioritize community areas with higher populations of low-income residents.

\n\n\t\n","imageUrl":""},{"id":20,"question":"What communities are eligible for the Chicago Prize?","answer":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

Eligible initiatives for the Chicago Prize must take place on the South and/or West Sides, in one or more of our eligible community areas:

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Your initiative’s geographic footprint does not need to conform to community boundaries and could span from a single building to multiple community areas. Initiatives should prioritize community areas with higher populations of low-income residents.

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Please note: Select only the communities poised to directly benefit from your proposed initiative on your registration form. Prior to submitting your online application, please reconfirm the information on your registration form is correct by going to Profile (top left of Dashboard) then Edit Registration Form.  

\n\n\t\n","imageUrl":""},{"id":21,"question":"What are the targeted outcomes? How will they be tracked and evaluated?","answer":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

The selected initiative must increase economic and social opportunities for current residents and make the neighborhood attractive to new residents, businesses, and visitors, while putting measures in place that prevent and mitigate displacement of existing residents and businesses. To ascertain likely impact categories, applicants will be asked to develop a preliminary outcome and impact evaluation plan. Specific outcomes could include increasing resident employment (either overall or in growth/high-wage sectors), increasing profits of neighborhood businesses, improving the financial health of residents, increasing nearby property values, increasing high school graduation rate of residents, improving physical and mental health, and decreasing overall and violent crime, among others.

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Finalists selected to advance to the second phase will be partnered with an expert who will work with them to develop a robust and implementable evaluation, should they be selected as the final Awardee. The evaluation plan will include both a formative assessment and a summative evaluation for up to a ten-year period of performance.

\n\n\t\n","imageUrl":""},{"id":22,"question":"My project tries something new. Will I be penalized for being innovative and not opting for a model with a stronger evidence-base?","answer":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

The challenge encourages creativity around the specific way that applicants will use the grant dollars, but it also hopes to fund an applicant who has a strong chance at successfully implementing a model and realizing the outcomes detailed in their application. We are expecting applications to span from innovative ideas that have not been tested in the field to validated interventions that are backed by rigorous evidence. No matter the level of research and impacts that supports the proposed intervention, applicants should detail the ways in which their proposed use of funds will affect short- and medium-term outcomes of the people and businesses in the neighborhood. For more information, click here.

\n\n\t\n","imageUrl":""},{"id":23,"question":"How can applicants use the Urban Institute framing paper?","answer":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

As part of the design process of the Chicago Prize, the Pritzker Traubert Foundation worked with the Urban Institute to write a framing paper that synthesizes recent research of model revitalization programs and innovative practices to help guide applicants, reviewers, and others involved with the Chicago Prize. The Urban Institute’s paper is not a guide for the Chicago Prize, but rather serves as a resource for applicants of the Chicago Prize to consider as they think about how to develop and implement a successful project. Read the paper here.

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